ASL sign for SOUTH AFRICA

Meaning: A country of southern Africa on the Atlantic and Indian Oceans.


Related signs: AFRICA, Nelson Mandela.

Deaf Bragging Rights

Wilma Newhoudt-Druchen (1964-present) was the country's first deaf female Member of Parliament in the National Assembly, serving her fifth term, which runs through 2020.

Braam Jordaan was the recipient of 2020 Henry Viscardi Achievement Award (HVAA medal) in December 2020. "The HVAA is the 'Nobel Prize' for the global disabilities advocacy." (Braam Jordaan).

Henry Viscardi Achievement Award medal for Braam Jordaan
Screenshot of Braam Jordaan's post, Dec. 3, 2020

"Braam Jordaan was born Deaf in Benoni, South Africa. With over 30 major international awards under his belt for film and animation work, he is known for championing better education in the Deaf community by drawing inspiration from the very community he is part of. He became a board member of the World Federation of the Deaf Youth Section in 2011 and delivered a statement at the United Nations in New York City about the right to an education in sign language. He was formerly an Honorable Member of Disability Rights Parliament in South Africa.

"Jordaan was bestowed with the Order of the Baobab by the South African President Cyril Ramaphosa in recognition of his efforts at raising awareness on the importance of sign language and the human rights of deaf people around the world through his work with films and books. The National Orders are the highest awards that South Africans can receive." -- The Viscardi Center

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