ASL sign for HOUSE


Video Speed:

Meaning: A building that serves as living quarters for one or a few families.

Related sign: HOME.

Gloss: BANK(ix1)/\, MONEY(ix1), IX-me CAN ix1-BORROW-me to-BUY HOUSE(ix2) LARGE

English equivalent: We can borrow money from a bank to buy this big house.

Closely observe how the signer uses spatial agreement, facial grammar, OSV, verb inflection for LOAN/BORROW.

Printable ASL for HOUSE

Deaf culture: When the Lapiak family (the Deaf family) purchased a piece of land (lot) in the 1990s, they requested the contractor to install a separate electrical wire for the doorbell and phone while building the house. A hearing certified electrician didn't know how and wasn't able to do. As stubborn as always, the father sought out a talented Deaf man to help the electrician with designing the "Deaf" wire.

The house has every room with two separate electrical outlets next to each other -- one is a sound version (hearing) and the other is a light version (h-eyeing). A lamp or a light bulb can be plugged into the light-based electrical outlet ("Deaf outlet"). Whenever a doorbell or a phone rings, each lamp in every room flashes.

Thirty years later, the Lapiak elders still live in the house today. [photos soon]

How to use ASL dictionary

Filter words: Enter a keyword in the search box to see a list of available words with the "All" selection. Click on the blue link to look up the word.

Alphabetical letters: It's useful for 1) a single-letter word (such as A, B, etc.) and 2) very short words (e.g. "to", "he", etc.) to narrow down the words and pages in the list. First, enter the first letter in the search box, then select the alphetical letter (and page number if needed), and click on the blue link.

Don't forget to click back to "All" if you search another word.

Add a Word: This dictionary is not exhaustive; ASL signs are constantly added to the dictionary. If you don't find a word/sign, you can send your request via the orange feedback box.

A number of some "Add a Word" words are sometimes received that are *already* available in the dictonary. Users sometimes overlook the words. Double check, check page numbers, check spelling. If a word is requested that is already in the dictonary, explain a meaning (e.g. "as in").

Use the present verbs and base words. If you look for "said", look up the word "say". ASL has its own present/future/past structure in sentences. Likewise, if you look for an adjective word, try the noun or vice versa. E.g. The ASL signs for French and France are the same.

Videos: The first video may be NOT the answer you're looking for. There are several signs for different meanings, contexts, and/or variations. Browsing all the down to the next search box is highly recommended.

Regional variation: Some ASL signs have regional variations across North America. Common variations are included, but specifically local variations are not included. Interact with your local community to learn their variations.

Inflection: Many ASL words, especially verbs, in the dictionary are a "base"; be aware that many of them are grammatically inflectable within ASL sentences.

Contextual meaning: These ASL signs in the dictionary may not mean the same in different contexts and/or ASL sentences. You will see some examples in video sentences.

ASL is very much alive and indefinitely constructable as any spoken language. The best way to use ASL right is to immerse in daily interaction with Ameslan people (ASLers or ASLians).