Language Development from age 2 to 2.5 in sign language

Age 2;0,3: The following referential words and phrases that Juli used this week: doctor use-stethoscope, boy sad, one more, father fix, earth, woman and man (both correct productions), honey make bee, some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months. During that week, Juli learned to use the personal pronouns correctly.

The video summarizes a first month of the language development and litarcy of the toddler Juli at age 2.

2:0,2: The toddler Juli talked about feelings what she noticed in the picture books, videos, and drawings: sad, crying, happy, smile, and serious or straight-faced.

I'm not sure if she understood the concept of "serious" or "straight-faced" but it was how she learned when referring to the specific one in the book.

Some examples of the following referential words and phrases that Juli used during the week (2;0,1) are: stuck worm (referring to the stuffed worm being stuck in the doorway in a home video), cat eat, candy please!, basement please!, Ash (a signed name), some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

The following referential words and phrases that Juli used that week (age 2;0,2): chocolate milk, drawing basement (drawing in the basement), walk slowly, (being careful on the icy sidewalk), some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

On the acquisition in English as a second language, Juli was reported to have spoken the English words, such as doctor and please.

2;0,2: When pointing at something that was not in the straight direction, Juli bent her pointing finger or wrist. For example, she bent her finger or wrist when pointing to the stairs which was on the side.

Juli continued to exhibit her possessive reversal errors. As for pronouns, I noticed that she avoided the pronoun for the object in a sentence, "I love you." That is, she copied me and signed "I love.." avoiding the last pronoun at all.

One afternoon Juli made a request for some hot chocolate. I heated up a cup of the milk, put some cacao powder in it, and stirred. I handed it to Juli who looked unsatisfied.

Juli kept pointing at something that I couldn't figure out what else did she need. Finally, I asked her, show-me and I lifted her up. She pointed at the refrigerator and we opened it. I thought, what could that be possible?

She pointed at the very specific spot where the drinks used to be placed in. Ah! Luckily, I did think well. She wanted a straw! I pulled one out of the drawer and she was all ready to drink. I introduced the signed word straw to her so she could make a request efficiently next time.

The following referential words and phrases that Juli used this week: chocolate milkfather work, some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2;1,0: She also imagined things using her hands such as painting and walking with her two fingers.

The following referential words and phrases that Juli used this week: ix rabbit scared, monkey hide (Curious George jumping out of the blank), kite (Curious George's kite), bird scared (during a walk), look-for, some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2;1,1: Juli uttered ix-me juli, translated as "I'm Juli." I've been waiting for a long time to see her using a pronoun in ASL sentence.

Talking about the girl's father in a children's book, I explained that Juli's father was not the girl's father. Another father. Juli then uttered ix-loc father mine.

While the concept of using a spatial reference is not established, Juli used a present referent to represent an absent referent.

For example, she pointed at her father's door of the room. She also used such spatial references for possessives.

The following referential words and phrases that Juli used this week: cinnamon, yogurt, webcam or video camera (also referring to video monitor), mother swim, hot chocolate milk please, please again, swimming please (begging a lot for swimming), some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2;1,2: She still identified objects with possessors by using yours, mine, and his/hers. Whenever she wondered whose this object or that one in the picture belonged to, she asked.

The ASL word want had become a common usage this week.

Nearing the bedtime, Juli dressed up and pulled down the door handle. She said (signed) "cat" and then put on shoes, coat, etc. all by herself with help. Then again she tried to open the door and signed "Ash, Ash, Ash". I realized that she wanted to go out and visit Ash and her cat! I told her it was too close to her bedtime already.

Juli wanted to watch the documentary "Baraka". By herself, she partially fingerspelled #BAR without help. It was her first incompletely fingerspelled word. She also attempted to fingerspell "Anna".

One day Juli came to my office and informed me sticky, sticky. Her hands were sticky from eating some mango. I asked her if she wanted to wash her hands. She shook her head.

I use the magical word mine/his/hers/yours, where in her stage, she used more of "your, mine, his" unlike the common "mine, mine, mine". Juli checked which object was mine (mother's), hers (Juli's), or his/hers (third party). I found it really easy when I told her, "It's theirs" or "It's his/hers." and Juli would back off and respect.

One night Juli was put on a big test whether the magical word really worked. She found a photograph that she became so possessed. She took it to her bedtime and refused to let it go. After all tries, I turned to the last resort. I told her, "It's mine." She let it go. I found this to be magical so from then on, I decided to use it sparsely. Ha.

The following referential words and phrases that Juli used this week: drive-to swimming (making repeated requests), store again (Juli wanted to go out again that day), grandmother come-here, outside drive store..music store (an unusual request), turtle hide, food/eat bite, apple juice, (one of her favorite uses), father come-here, some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

Responding with "yes" or "no" or shaking head gradually increased more often.

2;1,3: Juli also began to use the ASL word want much more often now. She would point at something and uttered want, want, want.

She saw a set of swing and slide through the fence of somebody's backyard. She told me ix, want, want, want. The other day she came across a booklet of toys and pointed at the colorful cart. She asked ix, want want want. The days of innocence were over. Now she knew she could ask for what she wanted.

Kids can choose not to listen by not hearing or not looking. Juli (2;2,0) closed her eyes when pretending not to listen or when not wanting to listen.

The moment Juli saw what I said in ASL, she quickly closed her eyes and/or closed her eyes with her hands. She pretended not to see.

For example, Juli wanted to stay and eat corns and peas. And, I wanted her to change her clothes into pajamas and came back to eat. The moment I uttered the first sentence, she closed her eyes with her hands that she didn't want to go to bed. So I had to articulate really fast to finish the second sentence before she closed her eyes.

2;2,0: The following referential words and phrases that Juli used this week: dog waggling-tail walk Juli ix-me (using a classifier for the waggling tail), want bath, move (to move the rocker), some more shown in the video above, and other cumulative ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2;2,1: Juli used personal pronoun in ASL sentences more often now. want bath me++ ("I want a bath."), Juli baby ix-me++ ("I'm a baby."), mother + baby, you + me ("mother and baby, that is you and me")

Some of the following random words and phrases that Juli used this week: flowery dress, rabbit store (a pet store), sleep, some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2;2,2: Juli had one of her first dardnest cute utterances. When Juli accidentally bumped her head on the floor, it hurt a little. She pointed to her head (hair) and told me ix-loc bandage.

Some of the following random words and phrases that Juli used this week: open please and close please (asking to open and close the truck rear door), new (asking for a new app on iPad), let-see (asking to see what's inside a container), some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2;2,3: Some of the following random words and phrases that Juli used this week: Easter (closed hands), baby woman (she seemed she tried to tell me a story), cl-ride (a classifier verb for "get-on and/or ride on [an animal]" ), some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2:3,1: Lately, Juli used the pronouns (you and me) lately and she did exhibit a classical reversal error occasionally. Even though she indeed understood the pronoun reversal, she sometimes forgot simply out of the habit in the process. She did correct herself.

On the other hand, she had been using the possessive reversal correctly and at ease. It's interesting that she used possessives before pronouns and used them correctly before the pronouns.

Some of the following random words and phrases that Juli used this week: [t]baby, woman walk cl-stroller, some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2:3,2: Some of the following random words and phrases that Juli used this week: pancake with syrup (new use of "new"), alarm! alarm! firefighter men (alarm outside), some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2:4,2: Some of the following random words and phrases that Juli used this week: father ix laugh; baby laugh (talking about her day with her father at a public site), entertainment-fair ix-there, horse ride-on (talking about the other day), some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2:4,3: Lately, Juli used the "which" in ASL. But, it wasn't clear whether she asked a question. The first one she produced was that she pointed at two objects alternatively a few times and then produced which.

A few days later, Juli pointed at two cups of smoothies alternatively more than a few times and then produced which. (See video)

Some of the following random words and phrases that Juli used this week: earth (on "Earth" DVD, using "6" or "W" handshape instead of '8'), spider, grandfather fly, (after listening to the airplane flying above), some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

thumb-up (interjection), bandage, man motorcycle (with "brrr" mouth morpheme), ix-you ix-truck ix-me ix-you (e.g. I want you on the truck),

2;5,0: Some of the following random words and phrases that Juli used this week: clown entertainment-fair (for "circus"), #nx (for "Netflix"), chase, and some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2;5,1: Juli used the ASL word want more often in her simple sentences: want bubble, want climb, want apple, etc.

Some of the following random words and phrases that Juli used this week: eat mother milk, want drink, car, man cl-get-on + cl-ride, school bus, father sick (handshape W for sick), horse ride-on (sitting on the crib fence), Hayden (perfectly producing her friend's signed name), some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

Language development: nightly bedtime chit-chats

I remember a night clearly when Juli and I had our very first bedtime chit-chat. Juli was about (8?) months old in my arms in the dark. She was studying an object. Suddenly out of blue sky, she exlaimed by pointing straight to the object, like "Look!!" Her sudden burst expression made me laugh.

Lately these nights, Juli (2;5,2) and I had our enjoyable chit-chats. She talked about a barking dog, a loud motorcycle roaring outside, how her leg got hurt, a car passing by, etc. At one point, she chatted long sentences, ix(leg) hurt. Fell ix-loc park. Car cl3-pass-by..

At bedtime, Juli tried to make excuses to get out of the bed -- food, book, ipad. No, no, no. She requested toilet but I couldn't figure out. It was new and the handshape error was "A" with the correct movement.

Juli pointed to the doorway and signed toilet repeatedly. She became frustrated. I asked in ASL translated as "Please explain another way. Tell me another way." Finally, Juli pointed to her bottom and signed poop. Then the ASL sign toilet hit me!

Next night or two, Juli did the same technique, having all failures before the ultimate success. She told me, ix-loc toilet poop. POOP. This time I did recgonize the signed word toilet (with the handshape error).

Some of the following new or re-emerging words and phrases that Juli used this week: funny (whenever Juli found something funny), walrus, Hayden (perfectly producing her friend's signed name), toilet, hamster #TV ("Super Pets" TV show series), umbrella, accident (vehicle accidents in video game on ipad), doorbell, telescope, puppet, some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2;6,0: Some of the following random words and phrases that Juli used this week: you[em] twirl (new skill she learned to spin herself around), ix-me want++ video, ix-me want+ ipad, ix-me want cl-walk[on rail], #OK, some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2;6,1: The toddler Juli frequently stated ix-me want [insert here] (translated as "I want...") as a way to emphasize or persuade me. She learned that I'm impressed, amused, and/or easily convinced by using this complete sentence in ASL.

Juli and I knew that we could understand each other with shorter phrases or even a single ASL word along with pointing. But, I encouraged her to express more in ASL sentences. The phrase "I want to.." was one of the firsts and she used it frequently to get what she needed and what she wanted.

Juli had articulated these utterances: ix-me want [X] where X represented "park", "ipad", "juice", "drive to (the) entertainment fair", "to sit (in the car) + drive", and "green apple".

Some of the following random words and phrases that Juli used this week: ready go, , some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

2;6,1: Juli asked ix-me want bottle-baby (she had never used a bottle before and recently newly got attached to it).
I replied in ASL (translated as), "You're not a baby anymore."
She repied back ix-me baby (I'm a baby.)
I told her ix-you before (You were.)
She mumbled before ix-me baby

Juli wanted to watch "Curious George" videos on our iPad. She couldn't type in the query to pull out a list of the videos. She asked me ix(screen) name what? ix name monkey?

Juli imagined herself to be something else sometimes or she'd joke herself, ix-me dog (I'm a dog).

As I unbuckled Juli in her carseat the other day, she asked if she could use the iPad to watch Curious George. I nodded. She told a story, monkey funny, monkey fell hurt.. doctor. I double checked, "Doctor?" She nodded with smile.

Some of the following random words and phrases that Juli used this week: ix-me baby drawing, i want [insert here] (a common phrase; also used to persuade me), tomato, understand, Thelma (a friend's signed name), come-here, downstairs, get-up, pants, some more shown in the video above, and other ASL words mentioned in the past months.

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