Children of Deaf parents (CODA)

CODA or coda refers to a child of deaf adults (parents). This term can be referred to hearing and deaf children of Deaf parents; however, it's typically referred to hearing children of Deaf parents because of the majority of hearing children. So, deaf child of Deaf adults are called doda or Deaf family.

About ninety percent of Deaf parents' children are hearing, whereas five to ten percent of deaf children are born to Deaf parents. That is, about 90 percent of deaf children are born to hearing parents.

Acronyms

Other coda-related term is KODA which means kids of deaf adults (parents) is sometimes used to refer to codas who are under the age of 18. There are other terms such as HCDP for Hearing children of Deaf parents but they are uncommon. The term "coda" is widely used.

The Third Culture

Codas are known as a third culture, growing up in both worlds of hearing and deaf. Like culturally Deaf people, many codas are bilingual-bicultural.

Some codas have an identify of being "deaf" (which really means their experience of visual/Deaf culture of Deaf people). There was a time when a five-year-old coda once told her Deaf mother that her identity is "half deaf" in ASL.

Who are codas?

Here are a few examples of well known codas, such as American comedian performer Keith Wann; comedian performers and interpreters (CODA Brothers), ...

Robert Hoffmeister, PhD (one of the authors of a book, A Journey into the Deaf-World) is a coda. He grew up on campus at the American School for the Deaf where both of his parents worked there as teachers in Hartford, Connecticut. He had an unique opportunity to have some school experience there, where most hearing codas grew up in public schools.

The Russian actress and coda Alla Kliouka Schaffer won the Green Apple Award for the Best Actress in 1995 at Russian Academy Award.

Any other more? Email me.

Codas, Dodas and Codas of Dodas

Both codas and dodas share some similar experiences, growing up with d/Deaf parents. The difference between them is that the former is hearing and the former is deaf.

There have been observations that when dodas (the minority) wish to be part of the coda events, hearing codas feel that dodas are not part of them based on hearing/deaf experiences. However, codas of dodas (hearing children who are born to Deaf parents of Deaf family) feel that dodas are part of them. Both dodas and codas of dodas are minorities.

Celebrating Mother Father Deaf Day

"Mother Father Deaf Day" honors Deaf parent(s) of hearing and deaf children, celebrating on the last Sunday of April since 1994 (designated by the organization, Children of Deaf Adults). This celebration recognizes the gifts of culture and language passed from generation to generation.

Many fabulous Deaf parents have raised wonderful bilingual-bicultural hearing and deaf children.

Related posts

Related posts: What's it like to live with Deaf parents or codas? / What life is like in a Deaf family?

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