Commands in American Sign Language (ASL)

An imperative sentence gives a command or makes a request. It orders or asks a listener to do something.

In ASL, MIND-NOT and PLEASE are a common usage for making a request.

ASL sentence example: DOOR/\ MIND-NOT/\ (you) CL:OPEN-DOOR.

A general sentence structure is as follows: OSV (object-subject-verb). Raise eyebrows for the object at the beginning of the sentence. After signing the object, lower the eyebrows to a normal level for the rest of the sentence.

Practice some nouns and verbs to make a command. Use the pop-up ASL dictionary in the menu to look up any words below.

Nouns: BACKPACK, BOOK, CHAIR, CUP, DOOR, KEY, LIGHTS, PAPER, PEN, PENCIL, TABLE, WINDOW, ...

Verbs: CLOSE, MOVE, OPEN, PUT, THROW, TURN-on, TURN-off.

Combine one of the nouns and one of the verbs from the list above and make a command sentence.

Related posts: Sentences types; Asking a yes-no question.

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