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Emerging two-word utterances in sign language

At age 14 months, the baby Juli began to utter two-word phrases sometimes around this time, her articulation or production became more clear.

At the very end of that week (age 1;4,1), in all sudden one Friday night, Juli produced some two-word utterances as follows:

Juli (1;4,1) asked for a star snack star eat/food in the gallery room. Then she led me to the kitchen cabinet. After eating, Juli uttered finished/done eating.

That same night, my cellphone vibrated on my desk. Juli told me phone.. phone father. I turned to look. Sure enough, there was a new message lit up on my cellphone screen.

At bedtime in her room, Juli relaxed and fed for an hour and then got up. She uttered eat grape. She led to the downstairs. She became highly energetic and bouncy.

(1;4,2) A friend Rene who had his signed name sat under the gazebo outside. Juli stood on the other side of the yard and produced friend Rene.

Juli (1;4,2) toddled around near the shoes. She pointed at the shoes and mumbled mine shoes.

Outside in the yard, Juli (1;4,2) produced grass father, referring to her father who mowed the grass the day before or so.

Sitting in the highchair, Juli (1;4,2) asked for more dragon fruit (see video). The other day, she pointed at the pan which her father was cooking with the day before. She uttered cook father.

One morning Juli (1;4,2) woke up and got up. Right away she produced hungry eat (open palm on her torso and 20-handshape twice on her mouth).

Producing ASL words (1;2,3)

The following words that Juli has used with references this week: goose (open handshape on the other arm), help, princess (20-handshape on waist level), water (20-handshape or sometimes flat-N handshape), dad/firefighter drive (two words) and some reguarly used ASL words.

Long awaited ASL word had reemerged which was mother ("A" handshape).

Juli focused intensely on her interests of the week and used ones of the most frequently used ASL words: vacuum (and broom), baby (she kept asking to watch her one-year video slides and often signed sneeze to refer to herself sneezing when she was a newborn, key (she requested me for it a few times or more a day).

Juli used to produce phone on the upper and farther back head. Now the location parameter of this ASL word has phonologically developed a bit more. The location is now much lowered (close to the neck) between the chin and the ear.

The following referential words that Juli has used this week: cook, mother, bath ix-loc dad (referred to Dude in the washroom), water (20-handshape), dirty, stop, some new words shown in the video, and some reguarly used ASL words.

Reporting

Juli, sitting on my lap in my office, uttered father out of the blue sky. I interpreted it that Dude was back home now. Sure enough, I saw the shadow emerging outside the doorway of my office. Then Dude came to the doorway to say hi.

Juli gazed at Dude as if she wanted to tell him. She pointed to the video of herself on the screen and then pointed to herself. Dude responded, "Yeah? What is on there?" He entered and walked around to take a look. "Oh, yes it's you!"

From there on, Juli continued to matter-of-factly utter father often whenever Dude entered home.

This documentation project follows a baby's language acquisition, literacy development, and phonological acquisition in sign language, specifically ASL, week by week from gazing at birth to manual babbling, to first words just before the first birthday in a natural native-ASL environment and visual culture.

The second-year and third-year documentation continues to follow the same child's language and phonological acquisition and literacy development in ASL on a weekly basis from the one-word stage to two-word and multiple utterances.

The documentary continues to follow the same child's ASL language and literacy development on a regular basis from age three to four. It surveys ASL phonological acquisition and more complex utterances.

These posts on ASL-English bilingualism, language acquisition, and bilingual education may be of an interest for parents who raise a bilingual-bimodal child in ASL (or another signed language) and English (or another written and/or spoken language of its respective) as well as informative and educational for ASL specialists, educators, and professionals.