Toddler signing ASL prepositions

A first ASL preposition emerged that I recognized for the first time. The two-year-old (2;5) toddler Juli commented ix-there for father. Did she actually sign for? I asked myself. Sure enough, she did use it again onward.

The toddler Juli watched an adorable cat next to a bowl of water in a large cage in a pet store. Juli told me ix-loc water for cat -- translated as: This water is for the cat.

About a month later (age 2;6), another emergence was the ASL word and that Juli used sometimes, such as ipad and apples (her breakfast at service).

Juli also used the ASL preposition with. Since then, she continued to use for.

One day, I told Juli that she would be going out with her father and me for a pony riding the next weekend. Juli signed with mother and father. I nodded that I would be going too.

Preschooler using ASL preposition "in"

There are two types of prepositions in ASL. One is the use of a classifier phrase in which the prepositional information is already embedded in a classifier predicate. The other type is the ASL prepositions independent of the other ASL words, such as "in", inside", etc.

Juli (age 3;0) had used the ASL preposition in lately. For example, Juli wore sunglasses on her face and referred to them, ix-me like ix-these in your house. That is, she enjoyed wearing her sunglasses inside our house.

Another example, frog sticker in father house. For the next weeks, she used "in" reguarly.

Signing Baby

This documentation project follows a baby's language acquisition, literacy development, and phonological acquisition in sign language, specifically ASL, week by week from gazing at birth to manual babbling, to first words just before the first birthday in a natural native-ASL environment and visual culture.

The second-year documentation continues to follow the same one-year-old child's language and phonological acquisition and literacy development in ASL on a weekly basis from the one-word stage to two-word and multiple utterances.

The third year documentation continues to follow the same child's ASL language and literacy development on a regular basis from age two to three. It surveys ASL phonological acquisition and more complex utterances.

The fourth year documentation continues to follow the same child's ASL language and literacy development on a regular basis from age three to four. It surveys ASL phonological acquisition and more complex utterances.

This five-year documentation and project follows the bilingual child's natural language acquisition in sign language from newborn to age five.