Adjectives in Sign Language

An adjective is a word or a set of words that modifies (i.e. describes) a noun or a pronoun.

In English, adjectives in English usually precedes a noun (in a noun phrase) which it modifies. They may also follow the verb they modify. On the other hand, in French, adjectives may be placed before or after the noun, depending on what their rules are. Likewise, adjectives in ASL can also appear either before or after the noun or pronoun, depending on how their sentences are structured.

Examples of adjectives in ASL: red, curly, beautiful, small, etc.

Examples of adjectives in sentences:

For the adjective "cute", /\THAT PUPPY SO CUTE! (That puppy is so cute!)

Signing Baby

This documentation project follows a baby's language acquisition, literacy development, and phonological acquisition in sign language, specifically ASL, week by week from gazing at birth to manual babbling, to first words just before the first birthday in a natural native-ASL environment and visual culture.

The second-year documentation continues to follow the same one-year-old child's language and phonological acquisition and literacy development in ASL on a weekly basis from the one-word stage to two-word and multiple utterances.

The third year documentation continues to follow the same child's ASL language and literacy development on a regular basis from age two to three. It surveys ASL phonological acquisition and more complex utterances.

The fourth year documentation continues to follow the same child's ASL language and literacy development on a regular basis from age three to four. It surveys ASL phonological acquisition and more complex utterances.

This five-year documentation and project follows the bilingual child's natural language acquisition in sign language from newborn to age five.