16 months old, week 2

Juli continued to pick up ASL words -- some new and some familiar -- on a daily basis. In addition, some phonological acquisition developed.

For example, I just noticed that Juli began to use the handshape "A" instead of "1" for mother, though interchangeable. And, the open handshape began to form into the partly closed handshape for cookie which was close to a perfect production.

Asking for another (or a different one)

The ability to articulate help has been very much helpful and quite functional that Juli used it reguarly. Now Juli learned another new useful abstract concept: another.

Juli frequently used the ASL word more when pointing to my office or leading me to the office. I knew she wanted a video of her babyhood.

She used to watch the video of her first year again and again. But, lately, I showed her several recent video clips for the second-year documentary "Toddler Talk in ASL". We lost in communication.

Because, there were many videos and she wanted a particular one but couldn't communicate enough. She resorted to tantrums. Okay, she didn't want that video. I picked another while told her (translated as) You don't want that one? Okay, another. Let's see another. She watched for a moment and then lost to tantrum. I picked another, okay, another.

Eventually, Juli picked up the ASL word another and used it to request for another video again and again. It was quite an accomplishment for her even though she couldn't ask for a particular one but at least she could ask for a different one.

Well, actually, she was able to ask for a particular one out of a few ones that we knew our own "titles" of these videos: "grandparents", "ladybug", and "baby".

On the other hand, remember I mentioned weeks ago that a new challenge arised when Juli began to talk about things that were not present, which meant that there was no finger pointing that accompanied a noun. Pointing was a big helpful context.

Since then, I also learned to pick up her productions that referred to their non-present referents.

For example, Juli and I went out for a stroller walk. She produced that I almost overlooked or dismissed but realized what she was producing: many homes (many houses). I sure remembered I signed that to her from time to time.

Another thing I picked up her production was outside (usually along with shoes) when she was around the door and the shoes. She probably wanted to out.

Kid says the darnest cute

Juli uttered the same production that referred to the ball part of the Dyson vacuum as fan.

The other day Juli first uttered butterfly in reference to an old free-flying torn plastic bag from nowhere. I corrected No, it's garbage. (translation) From then on, Juli uttered garbage each time she saw it.

Use of ASL words and two-word utterances

Watching the video clips of her first year, Juli uttered something. As the image of herself jumped in jumper, she produced jumping (index finger onto palm repeatedly). She did it from memory. I don't recall using it lately nor use it more than few times.

The following referential words that Juli has used this week: #MAMA(fingerspelling, similar production of "milk"), rattle, jump, clothes, monkey (making a request for the book on the kitchen table), another, some more shown in the video above, and some reguarly used ASL words.

At the very end of this week, in all sudden one Friday night, Juli produced some two-word utterances as follows:

Juli asked for a star snack star eat/food in the gallery room. Then she led me to the kitchen cabinet. After eating, Juli uttered finished/done eating.

That same night, my cellphone vibrated on my desk. Juli told me phone.. phone father. I turned to look. Sure enough, there was a new message lit up on my cellphone screen.

At bedtime in her room, Juli relaxed and fed for an hour and then got up. She uttered eat grape. She led to the downstairs. She became highly energetic and bouncy.

This documentation project follows a baby's language acquisition, literacy development, and phonological acquisition in sign language, specifically ASL, week by week from gazing at birth to manual babbling, to first words just before the first birthday in a natural native-ASL environment and visual culture.

The second-year and third-year documentation continues to follow the same child's language and phonological acquisition and literacy development in ASL on a weekly basis from the one-word stage to two-word and multiple utterances.

The documentary continues to follow the same child's ASL language and literacy development on a regular basis from age three to four. It surveys ASL phonological acquisition and more complex utterances.

These posts on ASL-English bilingualism, language acquisition, and bilingual education may be of an interest for parents who raise a bilingual-bimodal child in ASL (or another signed language) and English (or another written and/or spoken language of its respective) as well as informative and educational for ASL specialists, educators, and professionals.