Naming pictures or objects

The 12 months old (week 3) baby Juli became more acrobatic around. On the go, go, go. Juli had been a bigger questioner. She pointed to each image and looked at me for noun names. I decided that it was time to ask her questions.

In a picture book, I pointed to an image of the apple and asked ix what? -- translated as What is this? Juli responded apple.

Before I was about to ask the next, Juli already uttered banana. I replied yes, right!.

Later that day in her bedroom, I pointed to an image of the strawberry and asked what it was. Juli immediately replied strawberry which was the same production as shown in the last week's video.

Asking Juli questions gave me a clear glimpse into her ASL productions. For example, I curiously pointed to an image of the shoes in a picture book. Juli responded shoes (using an "S" or "A" handshape with the incorrect palm orientation).

Juli used to produce "shoes" with the open handshape which was more ambiguous with other possible meanings (e.g. more). Now Juli was able to form the "A" or "S" handshape which was an one step easier to recognize.

Naming referential ASL words in new contexts

About a month later (age 1;2,3), referring to things and naming them in new contexts had grown. The toddler Juli pointed to an object in a new context and identified it by naming it herself. This also showed me how she categorized or perceived things in the world.

For example, outside a familiar building, Juli pointed to the bushes in this new context and produced flower (location below nose, that is on the lips). Though, there were no flowers in this winter season.

Similarly, she pointed to the green plant at Grandma Z's home and uttered flower. She appeared to overgeneralize these green living things.

Juli walked into an empty preschool classroom and took a look around. As I was about to pull her out, a teacher said it was okay for her to wander around.

In this new context, Juli pointed to three relatively large stuffed animals which were not really easy to distinguish from one another and produced bear.

On way back home, flurries began to get heavier. Sitting in the forward-facing seat, Juli pointed and produced snow (production similar to "rain" in ASL).

Juli found a photograph catalog of Russel Wong's work in my storage. The front cover of the catalog showed a black and white photograph of Jackie Chan. Juli brought it and showed me. She pointed to it and produced father (20-handshape) twice or trice.

Language development

The following emerging ASL signs or words that Juli used with references: cl-bread-pop-up (toasts popping up), airplane, ear, foot (pointing rather than producing), firefighter, beautiful (when putting on necklaces around her neck, supervised).

This documentation project follows a baby's language acquisition, literacy development, and phonological acquisition in sign language, specifically ASL, week by week from gazing at birth to manual babbling, to first words just before the first birthday in a natural native-ASL environment and visual culture.

The second-year and third-year documentation continues to follow the same child's language and phonological acquisition and literacy development in ASL on a weekly basis from the one-word stage to two-word and multiple utterances.

The documentary continues to follow the same child's ASL language and literacy development on a regular basis from age three to four. It surveys ASL phonological acquisition and more complex utterances.

These posts on ASL-English bilingualism, language acquisition, and bilingual education may be of an interest for parents who raise a bilingual-bimodal child in ASL (or another signed language) and English (or another written and/or spoken language of its respective) as well as informative and educational for ASL specialists, educators, and professionals.